Registration is closed for this event
In October, the Queensland Taskforce on Coercive Control and Women’s Experience in the Criminal Justice System will report on its findings and recommendations of how best to legislate against coercive control as a form of domestic and family violence.

Coercive control is, ‘a collection of behaviours designed to strip someone of their sense of autonomy and self-worth.’ It is the most common risk factor leading to intimate partner homicide. So far, Tasmania is the only Australian state to make certain coercive controlling behaviours illegal. 

Proponents of coercive control legislation argue it will help legislators focus on domestic violence as a pattern of abuse rather than a one-off issue, raise community awareness and improve women’s safety.  

Detractors caution that coercive controlling behaviours may be difficult to prove in court, and it is not known how laws will impact First Nations women, culturally and linguistically diverse communities (CALD) and women with disabilities who traditionally experience harm and disempowerment when seeking help from the criminal justice system. 

In June’s Human Rights in Action webinar, we educate and disseminate information about coercive control and the work of the Taskforce on Coercive Control and Women’s Experience in the Criminal Justice System. Listen in as experts discuss the potential impact of coercive control legislation, particularly for CALD and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.  

Ask a question live, submit it to us via your event registration or email us at [email protected] by Wednesday 23 June. 

Date: Tuesday, 29 June 

Time: 11:00am to 12:00pm 

Location: Online via Zoom 

This event is part of our Human Rights in Action series which seeks to improve the capacity of the social service sector to understand how they can use the Human Rights Act in their work (advocacy, service delivery and service design).  

When
29 June 2021 - 11:00 am through 12:00 pm
Location
Online via Zoom
Australia